Rachel McCrum

Because The Night…Rally & Broad in Glasgow in May (& it’s our 50th Show!*)

Rally & Broad: Because the Night…Sunday 31st May, Stereo, Glasgow. With Caroline Bird, The Last September, Marianne MacRae and Hailey Beavis. Tickets £5 on the door on in advance here

…belongs to us…

Hola, comrades.

George Orwell reckoned you get the face you deserve at 50…

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From oor very first show in Edinburgh in October 2012. Look at those fresh wee mugs…

In May 2015, we’re celebrating our FIFTIETH SHOW!

Well, sortof – in all honesty, we’re not entirely sure if the 50th show is in Edinburgh or Glasgow and actually, it might well be our 57th, but pedantry bedamned, frankly. We’re going to have a party. There might be cake. Because The Night…belongs to us. In all its forms and dreams and terrors. Come raise a glass with us…

With some of our favourite old faces (they’re not old. It’s just…aye, ye ken…) and some utterly delightful new ones

CAROLINE BIRD!

CarolineBird

Caroline Bird is one of the most dynamic, incisive, astounding performance poets in the UK, while also being a playwright, performer and much more. The Hat-Stand Union (Carcanet) is her fourth published collection of poetry, and she’ll be reading from that, and new work besides. Also, she is an excellent drinking companion. We can testify.

‘Bird is irrepressible; she simply explodes with poetry. The work erupts, spring-loaded, funny, sad, deadly – you don’t know if a bullet will come out of the barrel or a flag with the word BANG on it.’
Simon Armitage

http://www.carolinebird.co.uk/

ALAN BISSETT!

AlanBissett

Author, playwright, theatre-maker, performer, activist. We never know what Alan is going to bring to the R&B stage, and we love him for that. We don’t know what he’s planning this time either. Come and see….

Bissett is a terrific performer, capable of terrifying, high-speed transitions…[has] wit, sharp political intelligence, and an ability to entertain his growing army of fans.’ (Joyce McMillan, The Scotsman)

http://alanbissett.com/

THE LAST SEPTEMBER!

TheLastSeptember2

The Last September are on an exciting detour into fresh musical territory, inspired by indie, folk, rock and the odd spaghetti-western thrown in for good measure. Come hear tunes from new album Volcano!

‘…tight, driven and energetic’

http://www.thelastseptember.co.uk/

MARIANNE MACRAE!

858720_10152637770660235_2108050673_oSurreal tales and poetic meanderings through the off-kilter of the everyday. Marianne is one of our new favourite voices on the spoken word scene in Scotland. Did you hear the one about the squirrel?

https://twitter.com/mariannemacrae

…and HAILEY BEAVIS!

HaileyBeavisR&B

Exciting and innovative artist, singer-songwriter and performer, Hailey Beavis is not only lyrically delightful but utterly captivating on stage. An R&B favourite and a must-see act!

http://www.last.fm/music/Hailey+Beavis

And all the usual spraffing and raffling with your resident comperes, poets, players-with-words, Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum. Come celebrate with us. Ours is a slab of Victoria Sponge and a glass of warm beer.

xx

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I’ll Get You Anything My Friend

Gosh, the April shows were jampacked with goodness! From Stereo on Sunday 26th April…The Creative Martyrs! Katy Hastie! A very special showing of Nae Pasaran! Luke Wright! Jonnie Common! Raffles! Spraffings! Solidarity! See ye next month…xx

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Because the Night… – Rally & Broad 50th Show! With The Mental Health Foundation.

Rally & Broad ‘Because the Night’ – Friday 15th May, The Bongo Club, Edinburgh. With Aidan Moffat, Kathryn Joseph, Anneliese Mackintosh, McGuire and Liz Cronin. Doors at 730pm, £5. 

…belongs to us…

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This month marks our 50th event since those heady, hectic begininings in October 2012 and to celebrate that, and many other things beside, Because The Night! pulls together some of our most favourite past acts alongside newcomers to the R&B stage!

In both Edinburgh and Glasgow we’ll be celebrating The Night with the help of excellent line-ups, and in Edinburgh, an extra-special partnership gig in collaboration with the Mental Health Foundation and the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival.

Because The Night! (Edinburgh) is simultaneously a sparkling line-up of utterly delicious lyrical delight to celebrate the Night (that is, the show, the show, our 50th show!) as well as being a celebration of using the arts to address the stigma of ill mental health.

With…

AIDAN MOFFAT!

AidanMoffat

Prolific and multi-talented Scottish songwriter in a special spoken word set. You know it all…Arab Strap, Mogwai collaborations, the collaborations with everyone left, right and centre, Lucky Pierre and a children’s book with Cargo Publishers, ‘The Lavender Blue Dress. So. Much. We are excited.

http://www.aidanmoffat.co.uk/

KATHRYN JOSEPH!

KathrynJoseph

Prodigiously talented and criminally underrated; Kathryn is one of Scotland’s best-kept secrets. Her voice possesses the other-worldly quality comparable to Ms Newsom and Björk; but she is by no means of an ilk. With songs from new album ‘bones you have thrown me and blood I have spilled.’

Bruised and yet beautiful, down but not out, her wonderful, visceral songs knocked King Tut’s for six. She is the real thing.” **** (The Herald)

www.kathrynjoseph.co.uk

ANNELIESE MACKINTOSH!

AnnelieseMackintosh

Author of highly acclaimed Any Other Mouth (Freight Books) and captivating live reader, Mackintosh returns to the R&B stage. We’re thrilled to see her again.

Winner of WINNER OF THE GREEN CARNATION PRIZE and listed in Books Of The Year 201 in The Herald, Favourite Books Of 2014 in The Scotsman, Top Scottish Books Of 2014 in The List,The Best Books Of 2014 in Civilian, Books Of The Year in The Cadaverine, The Best Fiction From 2014 in Scots Whay Hae! And Voted Top 10 inThe Readers’ 10 Best Books Of The Year So Far, The Guardian.

http://www.anneliesemackintosh.com/

MCGUIRE!

McGuire

McGuire’s first full collection “As I sit quietly, I begin to smell burning” is a wild mixture of poetry and short stories. In the spirit of verging on discovering catastrophe, the collection displays McGuire’s tendency toward the confessional, the social-realistic and absurd. Expect a live performance confronting Scottish cultural life, perversion, identity, masculinity and addiction.

http://a-glaswegian.blogspot.co.uk/

LIZ CRONIN!

LizCronin

Edinburgh-based songwriter and lyricist whose songs about love, life and sorrow are simultaneously heart-breaking and hilarious. An R&B favourite and for very good reason!

http://www.last.fm/music/Liz+Cronin

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With extra-special Rally & Broad based antics from yer resident hosts Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum. xx

Six Questions For….. Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum!

IRETHIN

Guid day! So, here at Rally & Broad HQ we got wind of a joint pamphlet launch from a couple of poetry/ wordy types. We like a guid pamphlet launch so we thought it worth conducting one ae our Six Questions interviews with the authors. We’ve never met them, but we’ve heard that they occasionally come to Rally & Broad, so we thought we’d check them out. Broad sat down with the Jenny Lindsay one, and Rally spoke to Rachel McCrum. We all got on pretty well, I must say, even though Jenny ate all the biscuits and Rachel tried to nick Rally’s lighter. Anyway – we’re going to head down to their launches at The Jazz Bar at 2.30pm on Sunday 11th (where they are joined by Christopher Willatt) and check em out at The Old Hairdresser’s in Glasgow on Thursday 16th at 7pm. Be nice tae see some of you guys there too – ours is a pint of chutzpah and a side order of cognitive dissonance. 😀

Broad to JL: Nice scarf, lass! I used to have one just like that! Anyway –  why ‘Ire & Salt’?

I spent ages swithering over this title! My pamphlet is essentially about personal and political power. Both of these entwine, both were fundamental themes of the Scottish independence debate (which is the back-drop to all the pieces in the pamphlet), and I’ve experienced both power and complete dis-empowerment both personally and politically in the last three years. A diagnosis of chronic depression and anxiety in June 2013, learning how to live with that and various ups and downs, being in a position of authority as an educator, having a platform, being an activist, amazing camaraderie, horrific break-ups… All have made the last 3 years pretty interesting and have made me revisit theories of power as part of understanding what I’ve just experienced.The Ire is the anger that powerlessness produces as well as the spark that can overcome it. The Salt is the tears of relief at retaining or regaining yer own agency after feeling dis-empowered.

It’s also a preserving agent. We’ve just experienced a pretty damn significant cultural and historical shift in Scottish politics. What is going to be preserved from that and who is going to preserve it? Who has power now and are we really as empowered as we could be, given the riff that Scotland has become empowered as a consequence of the vote? How many things continue to just happen at us and how many things can we shape? Political disempowerment and depressive illness share this one characteristic: both feel like they are happening at ye, and not something you can shape.

I mean, there’s also a fair bit ae word-play going on with that there title too, but I thought I should try to sound intelligent…

Rally to RM – Nice to meet ye! I got lost on the way here, sorry I’m late: I ended up in the wrong place. On the subject of place – Do Not Alight where Again? And why?

The long version…(or just skip to the end. There’s a much shorter answer after all this waffle).

Setting out this pamphlet has been a really odd process. Firstly, it feels somewhat overdue – the last one (my first one) was in 2012. C’mon, the poems aren’t even that long. But I honestly didn’t feel I’d done enough writing since Glassblower to have filled a pamphlet, or at least fill a coherent one, despite having had all these incredibly experiences with poetry trips to Greece and to South Africa – and not really having made time to write about any of them. If it hadn’t been for commissions and collaborations in the past two years, I’dve felt totally stulted. That’s not a word. Ah, it is now.

So, come January, I had all these half written poems hanging about and had convinced myself I was going to have to write a pamphlet’s worth of new ones in three months. On the verge of throwing everything up in the air for good in a suitably melodramatic fashion, I gave myself a bit of a shake, took the poems I did have, and found that they told a story, of sorts. So then I had a look back over the past two years, to try and understand where the story had come from…

It was the Scottish referendum. It was being in Scotland while it’s having what was (is?), let’s face it, a remarkably civilised debate about this huge question of future of the country, whilst being from Northern Ireland, which has not proven so capable of such a thing. Realising that because of this whole stupid hangover of Empire called the United Kingdom, being not so much an immigrant in another country, as, y’know, more of a blow in. But definitely not being Scottish. Despite all the invitations to engage in that process, despite the glorious and inspiring commitment to civic rather than ethnic nationalism that the referendum made, I honestly never felt more of an outsider than during that time. In practical terms, it meant it felt very odd to campaign and tell Scottish people how I thought they should vote. In personal terms, it meant I definitely wasn’t Scottish. How frightfully self absorbed.

Ouch. But, aye.

So that means I’m Northern Irish, right? And what the hell does that mean? I don’t live there. I don’t contribute anything to the culture or the economy or the society there anymore. Moreover, I’m of Northern Irish middle class Protestant heritage, one of the least sexy cultural heritages you could lay claim to, but it is mine, and how do you deal with that, flaws and faults and all? I still call it home. My family is there. There is a certain – character – that you could say is bred there.

There was also something quite specific for my generation, who came of age – I particularly mean the middle class lot who were finishing secondary school and heading out to university, but has also been true for any numbers of generations coming of age before ours – that Ireland was never seen as good enough. To make a life, a proper life in the world, you had to get out. The diaspora, all those ones wandering about.

Louis MacNeice writes how

‘I can say Ireland is hooey,

Ireland is a gallery of fake tapestries.

But I cannot deny my past to which my self is wed.

The woven figure cannot undo its thread.’

Which is all very romantic and maudlin. Don Paterson, with a more cynical robustness, talks about the ‘Irish boomerang – it doesn’t come back but sings you a song about how much it would like to.’

Putting the pamphlet together let me look at Northern Ireland, and find a way to love it (and I do – oh, you buggery stubborn country, I do, and I hope the book shows it) and leave it. For now, anyway.

There are over two years between the first and last poem in the book, and they move from asking you to listen to an accent and hear the story behind it, to making the accent vagrant, leave, move on. I’ll always love Northern Ireland, with a knot the size of a clenched fist in the pit of my stomach, but I’m done with spinning the guts out. I’d like to look outwards and forwards. I’d like to swallow the world.

The short and prosaic version…It’s a sign I first saw on disused railway platforms from a train winding up through the Highlands. Look at that language! It’s so politely firm and forbiddingly melancholy, all at the same time. Smashing.

DoNotAlightHere

Broad to JL: We at R&B HQ ken well the battle between Poetry and Promoting. So: Poetry and Promoting get into a ring and have a fight. What wins, and why?

Jesus. Of late, promoting. But! I should say that’s by design. I love programming events. I find it brilliantly fulfilling to create or co-create an event that artists and an audience can enjoy in that moment. It’s empowering for everyone, if done well, and it is a creative outlet in its own right. Poetry’s always there though – jabbing its finger in mah back saying, ‘Oi! I’m the bloody reason you’re doing this remember, fool!’ And so poetry always wins cos it’s the catalyst for the promoting. I bloody love spoken word. I can’t imagine ever not wanting to run events and I can’t imagine ever not writing poetry or whatever the hell it is I write. In conclusion: they go two rounds and declare it a draw. On a personal level, one has rarely existed without the other. I’ve been running events for as long as I’ve been writing.

Rally to RM: I’m crap with a hammer and nails and am prone to watching DIY shelving units crash to the ground. But I like DIY platforms. Tell me more about this and how you make them sustainable?

I landed in Edinburgh in 2010, via Manchester, Belfast, New Zealand, Oxford and basically a lot of dithering about in my 20s. I mean, I had a briefcase at one point – it was quite official looking dithering – but I didn’t really know what I was doing. I didn’t really know what I was doing when I landed in Edinburgh – ostensibly, the reason I’d moved up was for a PhD but I wasn’t too hot at that either. However, I had a wonderful Italian anthropologist for a supervisor who knew I wasn’t very happy, and told me to go forth and find my people – find my community – as this would help me understand the PhD better. I found the Forest Cafe.

The Forest Cafe, unlike anything else I knew, says ‘yes’ to everything and then works out how to make it happen afterwards. Without Forest, I would never have fallen in love with building platforms and stages, with seeing how empowering that can be for folk, and how much strength a like minded community can give one another. It was a whole DIY punk world that I’d never been part of before. I loved it then, I love it now. Some of the very best of people. With Forest came Inky Fingers, then Blind Poetics, then that thing that we’re trying not to mention here, and now, looking forward to summer 2015, SHIFT/…new solo shows from Scotland based spoken word artists for the Fringe.

But I also think there’s something really special about Scotland, about Edinburgh, in particular.

The way the DIY world supports one another – not just within poetry but with music as well – the sense of community, the space to try things out and suceed or fail, to pick yourself, to keep going, to collaborate. And the way the larger institutions – the Scottish Poetry Library, the Scottish Book Trust, the Libraries, the Book Festival, the City of Literature, even the University – connect with the grassroots scene, are aware of and support it – and vice versa. Maybe it’s a scale thing – we all drink in the same pubs – but maybe something more.

Ways to make DIY platforms sustainable? For my tuppence worth…

  1. Find a collaborator, a comrade, a partner in crime. Find a partner in crime with whom you can laugh, cry, drink and work. Who will support, share, provoke, energise you. Who you will always love to bits, and could kill half the time. Who will have your back and kick your arse all at once. Who has similar approaches to work and to appetite, to afternoons in cocktail bars and staggering to the late night chippie, to the occasions when to tell you that you look amazing in that dress and that that new poem is the best thing that has ever been written (and recognises when the time is to tell you that both could probably do with some more work). To mutally acknowledging the need, occasionally, to throw it all up in the air, have a nap, and start all over again. No, you can’t have mine. Yes, I know she’s pretty special. Get yer own.
  1. Find your community. The one you respect. The one that you’d push past exhaustion for. Learn from it. Don’t get so excited about the thing you’re doing that you forget to look around you and support the things that other people are doing. Don’t compete. Don’t self promote at the expense of others. Don’t bitch about one another. Find the thing you do, find the thing they do. Support one another. Hold each other up. Applaud one another. When you start playing, performing to more than yourselves – and you will – they’ll still be there. Still be there.
  1. Learn how to work with the professional world, the institutions. They are not the bad guys. They are there to help, and they’ll have expertise, experience and perspective to learn from, and opportunities beyond what you can achieve on your own. They’ve probably got public funding, and that means they’re reaching out to wider audiences than you could ever do on your own. That’s a good thing. Public funding for the arts is a Very Good Thing. And you are probably more nimble, closer to new audiences than they are, quicker to react and to act. You can help each other.
  1. Say yes to everything. Then understand where your energy levels are, and when to say no. Don’t burn out. Take care of yourself. Do the things that you believe have integrity. But where you can, take a leap out, say yes.

Broad to JL: What is the best gig, ever, that you’ve been involved with, and why?

Well, there is this one thing I’m involved in that is hands-down the best creative partnership I’ve ever been involved in and also contains my favourite ever events I’ve ever been part of, but I think we’re trying not to talk about that, right? He he! So: here’s another top 2!

Firstly, in 2006 the Scottish Slam Team went down to Bristol’s Old Vic Theatre to take part in the Three Nations Slam Championships. It was me, Bram Gieben, Graeme Hawley and Milton Balgonie. We won the national title and in the individual scores I came first, Bram came second, Graeme came third and Milton came fourth. We were the complete outsiders and no-one had ever heard of any of us. It was bloody brilliant.

The second has to be the National Collective Edinburgh Sessions from Jan – Jun 2014 that were organised by a small team and led by Cameron Foster and I. They were a great mix of art and politics, debate and discussion and they were informative as well as entertaining. It’s not often ye’ll get a debate on forestry alongside a spoken word artist alongside a theatre-maker alongside a discussion about fiscal policy. They were great motivation and built up a lovely network of friends and campaigners.

For balance: the worst was being heckled by an elderly lady at Stanza in 2011 who shouted out that my language was “appalling, dear!” It practically started a riot as the aforementioned Balgonie shouted “Nae censorship at Stanza!” and thus a short interlude of back-and-forth ensued with various members of the audience chiming in. It was the first time I had performed an hour-long show. Ever-so-slightly off-putting.

There’s plenty of quality profanity in a couple of the pieces in Ire & Salt though, so I look forward to a repeat of this in August…

Rally to RM: Oi! That’s my lighter! Harrumph. Anyway –  home and identity are a big part of what you write about. So: weighty question –

Where do you consider home?

Where I can lay down my hat. Where there’s a pot of Earl Grey. Where I can find a shoulder to rest my head on. Where someone will tell me their story. Where I can work as part of something bigger than myself. Where I can feel of use.

And that concludes our interview! Come hear and see these two and buy their pamphlets too. That Jenny likes a lot of biscuits and lighters don’t come cheap… 😀

 

Rally & Broad: Can’t Buy Me Love – April, Glasgow.

Sunday 26th April, doors at 230pm. £5. Stereo, Glasgow. With Luke Wright, Jonnie Common, Kirstin Innes, Katy Hastie and The Creative Martyrs. 

Eventbrite: You can book tickets in advance, didya know?!

Love love love. All you need is love. What it’s worth to you?

Joining us to suss all this out…

LukeWright

LUKE WRIGHT!

“Performance poetry’s key revivalist.” (Metro)

Luke Wright writes bawdy bar room ballads about small town tragedies and Westminster rogues. His fast paced, witty poems are crammed full of yummy mummies, debauched Tory grandees, maudlin commuters and leering tabloid paps. His live shows are enjoyed by thousands of people across the world every year, where he mixes the wistful with the downright comic to take audiences on an incredible emotional journey.

http://www.lukewright.co.uk/

JonnieCommon
JONNIE COMMON!

Glasgow-based songwriter and Rally & Broad favourite, with songs from latest EP Trapped in Amber. “With Trapped in Amber, He has taken sounds that are so bizarre that in isolation could be used by enterprising town councils to scare away feral pigeons.” (Folk Radio UK) Sounds barry tae us!

https://jonniecommon.bandcamp.com/

KirstinInnes

KIRSTIN INNES!

Kirstin’s debut novel Fishnet is published by Freight Books this month! Fishnet is about sex work, sisterhood and everyday economics, and is the result of three years’ worth of research.

‘Bold, sensual and unflinching, Fishnet lays bare a world too often misjudged and misunderstood. Kirstin Innes writes with courage, warmth and real insight. This is a hugely enjoyable and important book.’ – Emma Jane Unsworth

http://kirstininnes.com/

KatyHastie
KATY HASTIE! Glasgow-based writer and performer, Katy Hastie’s work combines strong performance and poignant insights that make for a cracking live show. A unique and engaging new voice!

http://glasgow.academia.edu/KatyHastie

TheCreativeMartyrs
THE CREATIVE MARTYRS!

“Cosmic everymen occupying a perch roughly midway between Vladimir and Estragon and Laurel and Hardy, the Creative Martyrs specialise in satirical songs on ukulele and cello, and the explicit nudging of their audience’s political conscience.” (Time Out) 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Creative-Martyrs/128578897375

Hosted by resident comperes, poets and general players-with-words, Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum. Give us your hearts. xx

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Can’t Buy Me Love: Rally & Broad in April (Edinburgh)!

Friday 17th April, The Bongo Club, Edinburgh. Doors at 7pm, £5. Tickets available in advance on Eventbrite!

We just don’t care too much for money. But we care a lot about love.

Joining us this month…

wwwdrunkenwerewolfcom

BELLA HARDY!

BBC Radio 4 Folk Singer of The Year (2014) with songs from new album With The Dawn. A prolific and ingenious artist, Bella Hardy’s new work documents the flux of life, good and bad, happy and sad. A must-see act of lyrical delight!

“(With The Dawn is) nothing short of a masterpiece.” (The Sunday Times)

http://www.bellahardy.com/

WilliamLetford

WILLIAM LETFORD!

William Letford is a former New Writer’s Award winner whose first collection Bevel was published by Carcanet Press in 2012. He is also an unmissable live reader and performer, and has toured nationally and internationally including as part of the Auld Enemies tour and Reel Iraq. He’s also a particular Rally & Broad favourite and we’re delighted to have him back in Scotland after he headlined oor second ever show in Nov 2012. Yass!

http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poetry/poets/william-letford

EmmaJaneUnsworth
EMMA JANE UNSWORTH!

Emma Jane Unsworth’s first novel Hungry, the Stars and Everything (Hidden Gem) won a Betty Trask Award from the Society of Authors and was shortlisted for the Portico Prize 2012. Her short story ‘I Arrive First’ was included in The Best British Short Stories 2012 (Salt). She has worked as a journalist, a columnist for The Big Issue, and a barmaid. Her second novel Animals was published by Canongate in May 2014. She’s writing a third novel, as well as the screenplay of Animals, which has been optioned by BAFTA-nominated producer Sarah Brocklehurst and awarded development funding by the BFI.

“I wish I had written this book… Withnail with girls.” (Caitlin Moran)

http://emmajaneunsworth.com/

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FAITH ELIOTT!

Faith Eliott is a musician and artist living in Leith. She writes songs with fantastical lyrics, makes drawings, puppets, sculptures, and tiny rugs out of mouse skin.

Songs here: https://soundcloud.com/faith-eliott

Artwork here: http://faitheliott.blogspot.co.uk/

FreddieAlexander
AND FREDDIE ALEXANDER!

In our New Voices slot this month, rising star of local performance events such as Soapbox and Loud Poets, Freddie Alexander! Freddie’s work is thoughtful, captivating and often humorous coupled with a raw talent that deserves tae be heard.

Hosted by yer resident sprafflers Rally & Broad (Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum). We don’t need no diamond rings. But come and lend us yer ears, yer heart and yer soul for the evening. We’ll pay it back with interest.

xx

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‘Ire & Salt’/’Do Not Alight Here Again’ – new pamphlets from Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum

This is definitely not a Rally & Broad event. No, no. It’s the new pamphlets from Stewed Rhubarb Press. An event in Edinburgh, an event in Glasgow. But it’s definitely not a Rally & Broad. It just happens to contain some of the same supporting cast. jennyandrachel The events…

  • GLASGOW!
  • Thursday 16th April, The Old Hairdresser’s. With support from Chrissy Barnacle.
  • 7 – 9pm, suggested donation of £3. Doors at 630pm.

The pamphlets… Ire & Salt Set to the backdrop of the referendum on Scottish independence, the pieces represented in Jenny Lindsay’s second pamphlet reflect a personal journey grappling with the contradictions in Scottish culture, in calls for independence, and in the way we view and try to attain personal and political power. Empowerment, individualism, autonomy, alienation – this pamphlet flips the lid on a life where depression and anxiety meets hopeful and inspiring political engagement meets frustration, ire and salt. “Defiant, eloquent and inspiring.” (Andrew Eaton-Lewis, The Scotsman) Do Not Alight Here Again Crossings, sailing, borders, salt, fathers, women, appetite, colonialism, home, grief. Rachel McCrum’s second pamphlet has been two and a half years in the cooking. It explores coming with to terms with life in a country that is in the middle of deciding its own future when you only – sortof – come from there. ‘The sense that this is the perfect way to say something is never far off…’ (Poetry Scotland) The poets… Jenny Lindsay Jenny Lindsay was born in Glasgow in 1982 and grew up in Maybole, South Ayrshire. She began her performing career as a singer-songwriter, whose lyrics were always better than her singing. In 2002 she discovered the live poetry world and thus began over a decade of writing, performing and promoting Scottish spoken word. Jenny’s poetry has featured on BBC Radio Scotland, the Rob Da Bank Show (BBC Radio 1), STV’s Nightlines, Channel 4 News and the BBC World Service. She has also appeared on Newsnight and Newsnight Scotland, and featured in the documentaries Homage To Scotland (dir. Justin Webster) and Scotland Yet (dir. Jack Foster, Christopher Silver). Her debut collection, The Things You Leave Behind was published by Red Squirrel Press in March 2011. Her first pamphlet The Eejit Pit (2012) is published by Stewed Rhubarb Press. She also features in Be The First To Like This: New Scottish Poetry (Vagabond Press: 2014) and Inspired By Independence (Word Power, 2014). Jenny writes about people, love, loss, politics, alienation, Scotland, and Edinburgh, where she continues to live and breathe. When she is not teaching, writing or promoting Jenny enjoys an occasional nap, frothy ales, and holding the world to rights in some Edinburgh bar-shack. Rachel McCrum Rachel McCrum arrived in Edinburgh in 2010, via Manchester, Belfast, New Zealand, Oxford and a small seaside town in Northern Ireland. She works as a poet and performer, has worked to develop the spoken word scene in Edinburgh with Inky Fingers, Blind Poetics and now co- produces Rally & Broad, Scotland’s cabaret of music, words and lyrical delight. Her first pamphlet ‘The Glassblower Dances’ was awarded the 2013 Callum MacDonald Award, as a result of which, she was the 2013 Michael Marks Poet In Residence at the Harvard Centre for Hellenic Studies in Nafplion, Greece. In Spring 2014, she toured performances and workshops in Johannesberg, Cape Town and Stellenbosch, South Africa as one of the six Scotland based Commonwealth Poets United, supported by the Scottish Poetry Library and the British Council/Connect ZA. Her work has been included in the anthologies ‘Be The First To Like This’ (Vagabond Voices), ‘A Bird Is Not A Stone'(Freight Books) and ‘Double Bill’ (Red Squirrel Books). She has performed alongside Liz Lochhead, Phill Jupitus, William Letford and Don Paterson, at the Latitude and Wickerman Festivals and many other places. . Rachel’s work explores national and personal identity, loss, love, frustration and things questioned and unsaid. She believes passionately in setting up DIY platforms, likes red wine, dark chocolate and strong pickles, and once upon a time, she went sailing.

Dance While The Sky Crashes Down (Glasgow)

Rally & Broad present…Dance While The Sky Crashes Down. Sunday 29th March, Stereo, Glasgow. With Apocalypse Redux (Bram E Gieben & Sam Small), No More Tiger, Hannah Jane Walker, Calum Rodger and Josephine Sillars. Door at 230pm, £5.

We’ll always dance. Let’s waltz over the rubble, strike a tango among the debris. Even when the sky is falling and the horsemen are riding in, whether it’s utopia or dystopia we’re facing, or maybe just the end, we’ll be making our steps. Come dance with us.

Joining us for the beautiful endtimes this month…

APOCALYPSE REDUX!

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Reprising their 2014 battle of optimism and pessimism, poets Sam Small and Bram E Gieben set the stage for the struggle between hope and cynicism for the future of the human race. Bittersweet, passionate, furious. Not to be missed.

http://www.bramegieben.co.uk/

https://samsmallpoetry.wordpress.com/

NO MORE TIGER!

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No More Tiger sing songs about bus routes, doppelgängers, people lost on desert islands, siblings falling out, local rebels and, according to singer and multi-instrumentalist Flore, about nothing at all. There are echoes of The Andrews Sisters, The Ink Spots, Jonathan Richman, The B52s, The Cookies in their sound and even a touch of Moondog, though they still have a unique and strong musical identity all of their own. There’s a lovely warm very charming easy humour between the members of the group on stage that makes you feel glad to be in their company while they are on stage together. No More Tiger deliver irresistible, pop and are fast becoming one of Glasgow’s most exciting new bands.

http://nomoretiger.bandcamp.com/releases

HANNAH JANE WALKER!

HannahJaneWalkerHannah is a poet and performer from Cambridge, now (sometimes) based in Edinburgh. She has toured nationally and internationally, and has written and performed in two award winning shows with playwright Chris Thorpe ‘The Oh Fuck Moment’ and ‘I Wish I Was Lonely’. She is passionate about engaging people with poetry and using poetry to have conversations and believes that poetry is just another way of talking, that poetry is for everyone and that it is something that we need as we go forward. We love her very much.

http://www.hannahjanewalker.co.uk/

CALUM RODGER!

CalumRodgerWhere to start with the unending fire of inventiveness that is Calum Rodger? Poet, performer, PhDist undertaking research on the poetics of Scottish revolutionary Ian Hamilton Finlay, co wrangler of The Verse Hearse, member of the CENTRE FOR LULZ RESEARCH, TED talker, author of ‘Glasgow Flourishes.’ Aye, well, there’s a start. ‘In my leisure time hedonistic impulses compel me to chase poetic reverie and probe at the outer fringes of poetic possibility by all technological and psychological means available.’ There’s an end, for now. Come marvel.

https://allrealcultureisfree.wordpress.com

…and JOSEPHINE SILLARS! (with the Glasgow launch of her debut EP!)

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Josephine is a singer songwriter, originally from the Highlands, now living and studying in Glasgow. Her voice is a think of ethereal beauty, and we’re thrilled to be hosting her debut EP launch.

http://www.josephinesillars.com/

See yous at the front. Ours is a visionary sours, with a maraschino Cherry float.

xx

‘Dance While The Sky Crashes Down’ (Edinburgh)

Rally & Broad present…’Dance While The Sky Crashes Down.’ Friday 20th March, The Bongo Club, 66 Cowgate, Edinburgh. With RM Hubbert, Alan Bissett, Lynsey May, Elyssa Vulpes and the 2015 Scottish Slam Champion. Doors at 7pm. £5.

You know we always love to dance. This month, we’re kicking up our heels while we watch the sky fall down, sequins and silk in hand. Whether it’s utopia, dystopia or just good old fashioned apocalypse, we’re dancing through it all. Come waltz over the rubble with us.

See you at the front? Ours is a swirl of radiation and star dust.*

It’s a particularly lush bill of delights this month. Joining us…

RM HUBBERT!

RMHubbert

Prolific Glasgow-born songwriter and guitarist who, in his own words, “writes music about love, death, friendship, mental illness and occasionally a dog called D Bone”. He is the winner of the Scottish Album of the Year Award 2013 (forThirteen Lost & Found); was short-listed for the SAY Awards in 2014 (for Breaks & Bones) and his live performances “provide the rare spectacle of a noisy rabble falling instantly silent to marvel at both his technical ability and the emotional impact of his music” (The Scotsman)

http://www.rmhubbert.com/

ALAN BISSETT! 

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Speaking of prolific: Alan Bissett is a novelist, performer, activist, theatre-maker, playwright and essayist – a man of many literary talents and firm Rally & Broad favourite. His Collected Plays from 2009 – 14 are released this month by Freight Books and demonstrate why Bissett is one of Scotland’s brightest, multi-award-winning literary and theatrical talents.

http://alanbissett.com/

LYNSEY MAY!

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Lynsey lives, loves and writes in Edinburgh. She was born to be wild but she didn’t realise and got into the habit of keeping receipts paying her taxes on time. Her stories are where the wildness runs free.

lynseymay.com

ELYSSA VULPES!

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…dreams and firelight, shadow and rock and roll. Late night tales of witchcraft, mystery and desire from battle-scarred survivors of the Love Wars…

http://www.elyssavulpes.com/

...and the 2015 Scottish Slam Champion BRAM E. GIEBEN!

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Scotland, hail your champion! Rally & Broad were both in attendance at the Scottish Slam Finals at the end of February, and such a night it was. We are without fingertips. The rightful winner, in the midst of glorious competition, was none other than Bram E. Gieben and we are delighted to have him (back) on the Rally & Broad stage.  Self described poet, performer, rapper, musician, novelist, journalist, record producer, ex-Chemikal Poet, Post-cyberpunk miserablist and crime junkie, it’s all held in one furious balance. Come and marvel.

http://www.bramegieben.co.uk/

* and with due credit given to Jason Webley, where the title of this month’s show has come from.

We’re Heading To The Sea! Rally & Broad at Dunbar Science Festival, Friday 13 March

Rally & Broad are delighted to be coming to Dunbar Science Festival on Friday 13 March (830 – 1030pm, Dunmuir Hotel, Dunbar)! We’ll be celebrating ‘Women in Science’ alongside Scots singer songwriter Kirsty Law; science writer and performer Emily Dodd, poet Russell Jones and the surreal musical stylings of Zara Gladman. Come with open ears…

With thanks to CoastWord.

Tickets may be bought in advance here.

Poster design by Cameron Foster

Poster design by Cameron Foster

The performers…

Emily Dodd!

EmilyDodd

Emily Dodd is an award winning author, working as artist, scientist and screenwriter (BBC’s Nina & The Neurons) to bring magic to readers and audiences alike. Her first picture book, Can’t Dance Cameron: A Scottish Capercaille Story was published in September 2014 with Floris Books. She can make balloon animals, and once made a ‘Guess The Poo’ interactive exhibit for an ‘Animal Imagine’ exhibit in Cardiff. She probably won’t be doing that at Rally & Broad. We think

https://auntyemily.wordpress.com/about/

Zara Gladman!

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Zara is a “zoo-lol-ogist” with a PhD in crayfish. By day, she works for Glasgow Science Festival, persuading the public to like science as much as she does. By night, she tries to write funny songs about animals, politics (via her alter-ego ‘Lady Alba’) and White Russian-fuelled nights out.

http://www.facebook.com/LadyAlbaNaw

@zanyzaz

Russell Jones!

jones hairyRussell Jones is an Edinburgh-based writer. He has published three collections of poetry, with a fourth due out in Summer 2015. Russell has also published his travel writing and is currently working on two sci-fi novels. He is the editor of Where Rockets Burn Through: Contemporary Science Fiction Poems from the UK and was guest editor for The Interdisciplinary Science Review (“Sciences and Poetries in the 21st Century”). He has a PhD in Creative Writing from The University of Edinburgh and enjoys cheese.

Kirsty Law!

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Scots singer-songwriter Kirsty Law s a Rally & Broad favourite and an utterly captivating live act. “‘Beautiful and feisty…  it’s a joy to hear a young singer and writer in Scots with such earthy and conversational character to her singing and songs… a young musician doing things her own way’ (Karine Polwart)

http://www.kirstylaw.com/

And of course, your hosts, Rally & Broad…!

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See ye there! Ours is a 99 ice cream cone with a sprinkling of subatomic particles.

xx